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Bracknell Film Society Selection
JULY 2018

Quarterly Classic
Second of two shows this month

'THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS'

To book a ticket for this and forthcoming BFS screenings please contact the SHP Box Office on 01344 484123 or click the logo below to book via the SHP website.
Tickets: Mon-Thur evenings & all matinees £9.10, Conc £8.10, Members £7.50
Fri-Sun evenings £9.10, Members £7.50
BFS Members £7.10 for BFS films - you may be asked to show your membership card. Phone reservations can be held for 4 days.

Thursday 26th July 7.30pm

Certificate

AWARDS

THIS FILM DESERVEDLY RECEIVED 3 WINS AND 4 NOMINATIONS
TO SEE THE DETAILS
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Director: Orson Welles, US, 1942, 86 minutes
Cast: Joseph Cotten, Dolores Costello, Tim Holt

The spoiled young heir to the decaying Amberson fortune comes between his widowed
mother and the man she has always loved. Still a masterpiece from wryly
comic opening to studio-forced ending, this remains Welles most
moving film with immaculate period reconstruction and virtuoso acting shot in long, elegant takes.

Article

In Orson Welles' all-time classic "The Magnificent Ambersons" -- adapted from Booth Tarkington's Pulitzer Prize-winner and repeatedly voted one of the century's best films -- we see a world of vanished elegance: of sleigh rides and serenades, houses with vast porches, great staircases and breathtaking balls. It is the Ambersons' world: the late autumn of a grand family of early 1900s Midwestern gentry.

It's a milieu that will shrivel and die, as the last of the clan -- killingly proud Georgie Amberson Minafer (Tim Holt) -- connives with his hysterical Aunt Fanny (Agnes Moorehead) to shield his mother, Isabel (Dolores Costello), from her one great love, car manufacturer Eugene Morgan (Joseph Cotten).

In the process, he scandalizes a town, damages two families -- and has his "comeuppance."

Mutilated by RKO while Welles was in Brazil, with several scenes re-shot by editor Robert Wise, it's still an American film masterpiece: witty, sad, virtuosic, a magnificent and heartbreaking elegy to the beauties and tragedies of a dying era and a family very like Welles' -- with a driven, reckless central character much like young Orson himself.

Beautifully scored by Bernard Hermann and strikingly photographed by Stanley Cortez, this was the last great Mercury production written, directed and narrated by your obedient servant, Orson Welles.

Michael Wilmington, Chicago Tribune Movie Critic