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Bracknell Film Society Selection
FEBRUARY 2020

'GOD'S OWN COUNTRY'

To book a ticket for this and forthcoming BFS screenings please contact the SHP Box Office on 01344 484123 or click the logo below to book via the SHP website.
Tickets: Mon-Thur evenings & all matinees £9.10, Conc £8.10, Members £7.50
Fri-Sun evenings £9.10, Members £7.50
BFS Members £7.10 for BFS films - you may be asked to show your membership card. Phone reservations can be held for 4 days.

Tuesday 11th February 7.30pm

Certificate

AWARDS

THIS FILM RECEIVED 30 WINS & 37 NOMINATIONS
TO SEE DETAILS OF A SELECTION OF THESE CLICK THE ICON BELOW


Director: Francis Lee, UK, 2017, 102 minutes
Cast: Josh O'Connor, Alec Secareanu, Gemma Jones
A young man struggles with his sexuality and the challenges of running the family farm,
when a Romanian migrant worker arrives. A refreshing atmosphere of acceptance permeates this
intense, moving work, in a stunning directorial debut.

An eerily beautiful love story between two men and the wild Yorkshire landscape
SIGHT AND SOUND

Plus short
Winnow
Director: George Lewis, UK, 2017, 140 seconds
A man from the city is intoxicated by the power of an ancient tree.

Article


“God’s Own Country” is a tricky movie, but not in a way that’s dishonest. Its first feet are in the school of miserablist realism, and while director Lee never abandons his things-as-they-are approach, he tells a love story by letting magic in at unusual angles. Most of which involve, yes, God’s own country, a ravishing landscape captured beautifully by the cinematography of Joshua James Williams. The land can be contended with, inhabited, but it can’t ever be tamed, is what the images tell us.

So too it is with life itself. After Johnny’s father suffers another stroke, Johnny and Gheorghe have to face the question: do they have the conviction to try and make their situation, both personal and professional, permanent? Homophobia is not the only potential issue here. When Johnny take Gheorghe to his local pub, Gheorghe is disrespected by a xenophobic older townie. The “what will Mom think” issue is actually resolved in a way that’s surprising and moving, as is so much in the movie.

“God’s Own Country” asks a lot of its actors, physically and emotionally, and they come through. Josh O’Connor navigates Johnny’s soddenness and transformation with exceptional sensitivity. As Gheorghe, Alec Secareanu brings matinee-idol looks, easy charm, and palpable thoughtfulness to bear. Gemma Jones and Ian Hart play Johnny’s parents, and despite a two-decade age gap between the actors, they are perfectly matched and in a sense, unrecognizable; they could very well be rural folks discovered by the director.

The movie’s denouement was ever so slightly sentimental for my tastes, but overall this is a pretty exceptional find; a solid story about how committing to what you believe in requires finding out what you believe in first. Sounds simple, but it’s not.

Glenn Kenny - Roger Ebert.com